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Rise and Fall of 8 So-Called Healthy Foods

Rise and Fall of 8 So-Called Healthy Foods

How health experts have influenced our love-hate relationship with foods like chocolate, cheese, and more

One day a health expert declares that eggs should be eaten every day to decrease the risk of heart disease, but the next month, a new study emerges with the opposite conclusions. Then, the information flip-flops again. So which is it? It's enough to make a health nut's head spin. Even for the majority of people, it can be difficult to figure out which foods pose the least long-term health risks.

Click here for the Rise and Fall of 8 So-Called Healthy Foods Slideshow

As explained later on, it seems the proper solution to the egg riddle has finally been solved. Maybe. What makes things so challenging are the conflicting studies and research that consumers are exposed to on a seemingly daily basis. While we can all rejoice when we find out our favorite indulgences like coffee or chocolate may in fact be beneficial, how do we know what information to trust? Even more fascinating is the way in which health experts' emerging credos can change the public sentiment towards an entire food group, sometimes with disastrous results for the agricultural or packaged goods industries. Remember the glut of Idaho potato advertisements after the low-carb craze hit the nation?

Because the same questions keep coming up about nutrition, we decided to track the rise and fall of these controversial foods. Is saturated fat good or bad? The jury is still out on that one. How much red meat should or shouldn’t a person be eating? Which study is the most trustworthy with regards to cheese and weight loss, the one funded by the National Dairy Council or the one conducted by Johns Hopkins University? Surely, it’s OK to use taste buds instead of rational minds to solve this conundrum. That’s how science works, right?

Finally, there are foods that seem like they will be health disasters but actually provide tangible health benefits — when consumed in moderation, of course — like chocolate and peanut butter. Perhaps someone should do a study that seeks to figure out if the sublime combination of these two foods is therefore a "superfood" — that would be a research finding we'd all like to read.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Got the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo? New study shows how heavy drinking affects diet

BUFFALO, N.Y. &mdash They&rsquore called the &ldquodrunchies,&rdquo or drunk munchies. It&rsquos the desire one has to eat salty, fatty, unhealthy foods during or after a night of heavy drinking.

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day when, most likely, they&rsquore hungover. It should come as no surprise that they&rsquore not eating kale smoothies and fresh oranges at 4 a.m.

&ldquoGiven the obesity epidemic and the rates of alcohol consumption on college campuses, we need to be aware of not only the negative effect of alcohol consumption, but also the impact it has on what people are eating while they are drinking,&rdquo says Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the University at Buffalo&rsquos School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Kruger, PhD, is the lead author on a newly published paper that examines heavy episodic drinking and dietary choices while drinking and on the following day.

Kruger and her colleagues from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University, conducted their study on a sample of 286 students at a large public university in the Midwest. (The study, published in the Californian Journal of Health Promotion, did not receive any federal funding.)

Research on the effects of drinking and diet is scarce, Kruger said, adding that eating more unhealthy foods following alcohol consumption is an often overlooked behavior in traditional addiction research.

The inspiration for the study came from an ad she and some of her co-authors saw in a university newspaper. &ldquoIt said, &lsquoGot Drunchies?&rsquo and had ads for pizza, tacos, and other fast-food places that were open late after the bars closed,&rdquo Kruger says.

With 65 percent of U.S. college students reporting that they regularly drink alcohol, it&rsquos important, Kruger says, to study how alcohol consumption impacts diet, especially on and near college campuses, which tend to have a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options nearby.

Consider, for example, that the average beer contains 150 calories. If a person drinks five beers, that&rsquos 750 calories, or a third of their daily energy intake. Add two slices of pizza or a burrito to that at the end of the night, and it&rsquos a recipe for weight gain.

&ldquoSo, we dug a bit deeper and first figured out what the &lsquodrunchies&rsquo were, and then decided this would be interesting to study. Our first study in this area focused on what people ate while drinking alcohol. This study explored what they eat the day after drinking,&rdquo Kruger said.

Study participants were asked to complete an anonymous online survey, which began with general questions around diet, such as &ldquoWhat do you typically eat for your first meal of the day?&rdquo and &ldquoHow often do you eat something before you go to bed?&rdquo

Later in the survey, they were asked how often they ate something before bed on nights when they drank alcohol, and what they ate. They were also asked what they typically ate for their first meal the day after a night of binge drinking.

Researchers found that drinking influenced study participants&rsquo dietary behaviors before going to bed. &ldquoAll alcohol drinkers were more likely to eat something before they went to bed after drinking alcohol than in general before they go to bed,&rdquo Kruger and her colleagues wrote.

Specifically, they were more likely to opt for salty snack foods and pizza. Healthy foods, such as dark green vegetables and other veggies they would ordinarily eat, weren&rsquot as appealing.

Of particular concern, the researchers noted, was the fact that participants didn&rsquot report drinking more water or other non-alcoholic beverages before bed. That exacerbates dehydration, which may lead to additionally unhealthy food choices.

The following day after drinking, participants&rsquo dietary patterns varied from the night before. They were less likely to skip meals the morning after a night of drinking compared to a typical morning.

And they favored foods like pizza or tacos over milk and dairy products and grains, most likely because of the so-called hangover cures that get passed down to students and which entail eating foods that &ldquosoak up&rdquo the alcohol. Dispelling these myths is one way to promote a healthy diet even after a night of binge drinking, Kruger says.

So what&rsquos happening in the body that causes the drunchies? &ldquoIt is believed that after drinking alcohol, the amount of blood glucose in the body can rise and fall which stimulates the brain to feel hungry,&rdquo Kruger explains.

Kruger says the study&rsquos findings point to the need for universities to encourage healthy eating at all times of the day, including late at night, by reducing the offerings of unhealthy foods and promoting nutrient dense options.


Watch the video: ΟΜΑΔΕΣ ΤΡΟΦΙΜΩΝ (November 2021).